Posts Tagged ‘HP’

HP Microserver TPM

Friday, January 10th, 2014

I’ve been dabbling with DNSSEC which involves creating a few zone- and key-signing keys, and it became immediately apparent that my headless HP Microserver has very poor entropy generation for /dev/random. After poking and prodding it became apparent there’s no dormant hardware RNG that I can just enable to fix it.

Eventually I stumbled on this post which suggests you can install and make use of the optional TPM as a source of entropy.

I picked up one cheaply and installed it following the above instructions to install and configure it; I found I only needed to remove the power cord for safety’s sake, the TPM connector on the motherboard is right at the front so I didn’t need to pull the tray out.

Also, since that blog post, the rng-tools package on RHEL/CentOS 6.x now includes an init script so it’s just a case of doing the following final step:

# chkconfig rngd on
# service rngd start

It should then be possible to pass this up to any KVM guests using the virtio-rng.ko module.

HP Microserver Remote Management Card

Saturday, January 28th, 2012

I recently acquired the Remote Management card for my HP Microserver, which allows remote KVM & power control, IPMI management and hardware monitoring through temperature & fan sensors.

Note the extra connector on the card in addition to the standard PCI-e x1 connector which matches the dedicated slot on the Microserver motherboard. This presented a bit of a problem as I was using the space for the battery backup module for the RAID controller in the neighbouring slot.

Thankfully the long ribbon cable meant I could route the battery up to the space behind the DVD burner freeing the slot again. Once the card was installed and everything screwed back together I booted straight back into CentOS. Given IPMI is touted as a feature I figured that was the first thing to try so I installed OpenIPMI:

# yum -y install OpenIPMI ipmitool
...
# service ipmi start
Starting ipmi drivers:                                     [  OK  ]
# ipmitool chassis status
Could not open device at /dev/ipmi0 or /dev/ipmi/0 or /dev/ipmidev/0: No such file or directory
Error sending Chassis Status command

Hmm, not good. Looking at dmesg shows the following is output when the IPMI drivers get loaded:

ipmi message handler version 39.2
IPMI System Interface driver.
ipmi_si: Adding SMBIOS-specified kcs state machine
ipmi_si: Adding ACPI-specified smic state machine
ipmi_si: Trying SMBIOS-specified kcs state machine at i/o address 0xca8, slave address 0x20, irq 0
ipmi_si: Interface detection failed
ipmi_si: Trying ACPI-specified smic state machine at mem address 0x0, slave address 0x0, irq 0
Could not set up I/O space
ipmi device interface

From reading the PDF manual it states that the IPMI KCS interface is at 0xCA2 in memory, not 0xCA8 that the kernel is trying to probe. Looking at the output from dmidecode shows where this value is probably coming from:

# dmidecode --type 38
# dmidecode 2.11
SMBIOS 2.6 present.
 
Handle 0x001B, DMI type 38, 18 bytes
IPMI Device Information
	Interface Type: KCS (Keyboard Control Style)
	Specification Version: 1.5
	I2C Slave Address: 0x10
	NV Storage Device: Not Present
	Base Address: 0x0000000000000CA8 (I/O)
	Register Spacing: Successive Byte Boundaries

This suggests a minor bug in the BIOS.

Querying the ipmi_si module with modinfo shows it can be persuaded to use a different I/O address so I created /etc/modprobe.d/ipmi.conf containing the following:

1
options ipmi_si type=kcs ports=0xca2

Then bounce the service to reload the modules and try again:

# service ipmi restart
Stopping all ipmi drivers:                                 [  OK  ]
Starting ipmi drivers:                                     [  OK  ]

As of CentOS 6.4, the above won’t work as the ipmi_si module is now compiled into the kernel. Instead, you need to edit /etc/grub.conf and append the following to your kernel parameters:

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ipmi_si.type=kcs ipmi_si.ports=0xca2

Thanks to this post for the info. Instead of bouncing the service you’ll need to reboot, then try again:

# ipmitool chassis status
System Power         : on
Power Overload       : false
Power Interlock      : inactive
Main Power Fault     : false
Power Control Fault  : false
Power Restore Policy : always-off
Last Power Event     : 
Chassis Intrusion    : inactive
Front-Panel Lockout  : inactive
Drive Fault          : false
Cooling/Fan Fault    : false
# ipmitool sdr
Watchdog         | 0x00              | ok
CPU_THEMAL       | 32 degrees C      | ok
NB_THERMAL       | 35 degrees C      | ok
SEL Rate         | 0 messages        | ok
AMBIENT_THERMAL  | 20 degrees C      | ok
EvtLogDisabled   | 0x00              | ok
System Event     | 0x00              | ok
SYS_FAN          | 1000 RPM          | ok
CPU Thermtrip    | 0x00              | ok
Sys Pwr Monitor  | 0x00              | ok

Success! With that sorted, you can now use ipmitool to further configure the management card, although not all of the settings are accessible such as IPv6 network settings so you have to use the BIOS or web interface for some of it.

Overall, I’m fairly happy with the management card. It has decent IPv6 support and the Java KVM client works okay on OS X should I ever need it but I couldn’t coax the separate virtual media client to work, I guess only Windows is supported.

Forcing GUID Partition Table on a disk with CentOS 6

Saturday, August 6th, 2011

CentOS 6 is now out so I can finally build up a new HP ProLiant Microserver that I purchased for a new home server. Amongst many new features, CentOS 6 ships a GRUB bootloader that can boot from a disk with a GUID Partition Table (GPT for short). Despite not having EFI, the HP BIOS can boot from GPT disks so there’s no limitation with disk sizes that I can use.

However, before I tore down my current home server I wanted to test all of this really did work so I popped a “small” 500 GB disk in the HP. The trouble is the CentOS installer won’t use GPT if the disk is smaller than 2 TB. Normally this wouldn’t be a problem with a single disk apart from I want to specifically test GPT functionality but this can cause complications if your disk is in fact a hardware RAID volume because most RAID controllers allow the following scenario:

  1. You have a RAID 5 volume comprising 4x 500 GB disks, so the OS sees ~ 1.5 TB raw space.
  2. Pull one 500 GB disk, replace with a 1 TB disk, wait for RAID volume to rebuild.
  3. Rinse and repeat until all disks are upgraded.
  4. Grow RAID volume to use the extra space, OS now sees ~ 3 TB raw space.
  5. Resize partitions on the volume, grow filesystems, etc.

You’ll find your volume will have a traditional MBR partition scheme as it fell below the 2 TB limit so you can’t resize the partitions to fully use the new space. While it might be possible to non-destructively convert MBR to GPT, I wouldn’t want to risk it with terabytes of data. It would be far better to just use GPT from the start to save painting myself into a corner later.

If you’re doing a normal install, start the installer until you get to what’s known as stage 2 such that on (ctrl+)alt+F2 you have a working shell. From here, you can use parted to create an empty GPT on the disk:

# /usr/sbin/parted -s /dev/sda mklabel gpt

Return to the installer and keep going until you reach the partitioning choices. Pick the “use empty space” option and the installer will create new partitions within the new GPT. If you choose the “delete everything” option, the installer will replace the GPT with MBR again.

If like me you’re using kickstart to automate the install process, you can do something similar in your kickstart file with the %pre section, something like the following:

%pre
/usr/sbin/parted -s /dev/sda mklabel gpt
%end

Then make sure your kickstart contains no clearpart instructions so it will default to just using the empty space. The only small nit I found after the install is that the minimal install option only includes fdisk and not parted as well so if you want to manage the disk partitions you’ll need to add that either at install time or afterwards as fdisk doesn’t support GPT.